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Humza Yousaf’s Resignation: His Principled Stand with Palestine and Uncertain Future for SNP and Scottish IndependenceHamza Yousaf, a pro-independence Scottish politician, announced his resignation from his positions, stating that he is not willing to remain in power at any cost. Yousaf stated, “I will not compromise on my principles and values, and I do not seek power at any price.” Yousaf, who had repeatedly criticized the killing of Palestinians, was the only major party leader in the United Kingdom to propose a ceasefire in Gaza to Parliament, although all major parties rejected his proposal. The opposition of the ruling party in the United Kingdom to the approaches of the leader of the Scottish National Party and other political parties in Scotland limited his tenure to 13 months. During a press conference where his resignation was announced, emphasis was placed by Yousaf on the continuation of advocating for the rights of those whose voices are not heard, both within this country and abroad, including those suffering in Gaza, which is regarded as one of the world’s greatest humanitarian crises. Humza Yousaf’s resignation and his decision to step down as first minister and SNP has thrown the party into chaos. It also boosted hopes in the United Kingdom’s opposition Labour Party that it can regain Scottish seats and win a national election later this year. Who is Humza Yousaf? Mr Yousaf—the MSP for Glasgow Pollok—was born in the city on 7 April 1985 to a Pakistani father and a Kenyan mother. He studied at Hutchesons’ Grammar School in Glasgow and became interested in politics during his youth. During his university years, he joined the SNP. He was also president of the Muslim Students Association and involved in the Students’ Representative Council. Mr Yousaf became the youngest MSP in 2011. In 2012, he served as Scotland’s first non-white and Muslim minister. In 2016, during Nicola Sturgeon’s election campaign, Mr Yousaf was appointed transport minister. After cabinet reshuffles in 2018, he was promoted to the position of justice secretary. Continuing his political ascent, he assumed the health secretary role in 2021. Humza Yousaf’s resignation in 2024 marks his most recent significant action in Scotland’s political landscape. Yousaf’s televised announcement about his resignation Humza Yousaf’s resignation dominated the headlines as he cited his reasons for stepping down. In his announcement, he stated, “Ending the Bute House Agreement while a route through this week’s Motion of No Confidence was possible. I am unwilling to trade my values and principles or deal with whomever simply for retaining power.” Glasgow-born Yousaf, whose paternal grandparents and father emigrated to Scotland from Pakistan in the 1960s, was celebrated as a polished communicator. The SNP had hoped he would be the unifying figure to mend the party’s divisions. The latest challenge of Yousaf as the first minister terminated his duty. Mr Yousaf’s most significant challenge came just over a year after he took up the premiership amid anger in Holyrood. In April 2024, the first minister announced the termination of the power-sharing deal with the Scottish Green Party. The Greens had desired to vote on the agreement’s future. This vote is over outrage at the SNP’s scrapping of crucial climate goals. It also includes the response to the Cass report into gender services for under-18s in England and Wales. Hours after some news that he would leave Hollywood, Humza Yousaf’s Resignation was declared. Humza said he had misjudged the feelings of the Green Party when he cut relations with them. One of the reasons for Humza Yousaf’s resignation could be his different idea about Palestine. Humza Yousaf previously wrote to Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, urging the United Kingdom to recognize the State of Palestine officially. His goal was to break the political deadlock that has condemned Israelis and Palestinians to ongoing cycles of violence. The letter was sent before a discussion in the Scottish Parliament on the condition of the Middle East on 21 November. Yousaf also sent the letter to the Leader of the Opposition in the U.K. Parliament, Sir Keir Starmer. He opened the debate on a government motion calling for the release of hostages and urging all regional actors to agree to an immediate ceasefire. In the letter, Yousaf expressed his views on the Gaza crisis and suggested that the U.K. recognize the State of Palestine within the 1967 borders, similar to the 130 members of the United Nations, including nine E.U. members, and as the new Spanish Government has promised. Yousaf criticising Westminster In broadcast interviews, the former Leader of Scotland’s devolved administration expressed sorrow about Gaza. Yousaf said to ITV News when questioned if he believes the U.K. government is respecting Palestinian lives the same way it values those of Israelis. He added, “That is the exact point, that the life of a Palestinian is equal to the life of an Israeli”. Yousaf also informed earlier that his mother-in-law and father-in-law were in Gaza. He stated that there is a lack of political consideration for the poor people of Gaza. It feels like ‘Palestinian blood is very cheap’, he said. What was the record of SNP in elections? When Labour collapsed from 41 seats to just one in 2015, it wasn’t easy to see any road to recovery. During the Independence Referendum, the SNP went from six M.P.s to 56. In 2017, Labour won six additional seats, representing 27.1% of the vote – a 2.8% increase from the previous election. However, the Conservatives performed best, almost doubling their vote share in gaining 12 seats. The SNP lost 21 seats as their vote share declined by 13.1%. The Conservatives and the SNP shaped the constitutional debate, with the former becoming the main opposition to SNP and independence. In 2019, the SNP solidified its lead, winning 45% of the vote, gaining 14 seats while losing one. Despite experiencing a mere 3.5% decrease in their vote share, the Conservatives ceded seven seats to the SNP. Labour’s advancement in 2017 was nullified, with the party witnessing an 8.4% drop in vote share and losing six seats to the SNP. Consistent with 2015, Edinburgh South remained the sole Labour seat that the SNP could not capture. SNP’s outlook post-Humza Yousaf’s resignation Scotland’s first minister, John Swinney, has admitted that the upcoming general election will be challenging. The SNP experienced a “tough time” after Humza Yousaf’s Resignation. However, members are “united” and “focused on winning.” Heading into this election, however, Labour led the SNP by 4 points. This is the first time Labour has led the SNP since the party was nearly wiped out in 2015. Labour looks set to regain a significant foothold in Scotland, particularly in its former heartlands in the central belt. One in three Scots (33%) currently intend to vote for Labour at the forthcoming general election, followed by the SNP (31%). The SNP have lost a fifth (20%) of their 2019 voters to Labour, but they hold on to 66% of those who previously backed them.

Humza Yousaf's Resignation

Hamza Yousaf, a pro-independence Scottish politician, announced his resignation from his positions, stating that he is not willing to remain...

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Humza Yousaf’s Resignation: His Principled Stand with Palestine and Uncertain Future for SNP and Scottish IndependenceHamza Yousaf, a pro-independence Scottish politician, announced his resignation from his positions, stating that he is not willing to remain in power at any cost. Yousaf stated, “I will not compromise on my principles and values, and I do not seek power at any price.” Yousaf, who had repeatedly criticized the killing of Palestinians, was the only major party leader in the United Kingdom to propose a ceasefire in Gaza to Parliament, although all major parties rejected his proposal. The opposition of the ruling party in the United Kingdom to the approaches of the leader of the Scottish National Party and other political parties in Scotland limited his tenure to 13 months. During a press conference where his resignation was announced, emphasis was placed by Yousaf on the continuation of advocating for the rights of those whose voices are not heard, both within this country and abroad, including those suffering in Gaza, which is regarded as one of the world’s greatest humanitarian crises. Humza Yousaf’s resignation and his decision to step down as first minister and SNP has thrown the party into chaos. It also boosted hopes in the United Kingdom’s opposition Labour Party that it can regain Scottish seats and win a national election later this year. Who is Humza Yousaf? Mr Yousaf—the MSP for Glasgow Pollok—was born in the city on 7 April 1985 to a Pakistani father and a Kenyan mother. He studied at Hutchesons’ Grammar School in Glasgow and became interested in politics during his youth. During his university years, he joined the SNP. He was also president of the Muslim Students Association and involved in the Students’ Representative Council. Mr Yousaf became the youngest MSP in 2011. In 2012, he served as Scotland’s first non-white and Muslim minister. In 2016, during Nicola Sturgeon’s election campaign, Mr Yousaf was appointed transport minister. After cabinet reshuffles in 2018, he was promoted to the position of justice secretary. Continuing his political ascent, he assumed the health secretary role in 2021. Humza Yousaf’s resignation in 2024 marks his most recent significant action in Scotland’s political landscape. Yousaf’s televised announcement about his resignation Humza Yousaf’s resignation dominated the headlines as he cited his reasons for stepping down. In his announcement, he stated, “Ending the Bute House Agreement while a route through this week’s Motion of No Confidence was possible. I am unwilling to trade my values and principles or deal with whomever simply for retaining power.” Glasgow-born Yousaf, whose paternal grandparents and father emigrated to Scotland from Pakistan in the 1960s, was celebrated as a polished communicator. The SNP had hoped he would be the unifying figure to mend the party’s divisions. The latest challenge of Yousaf as the first minister terminated his duty. Mr Yousaf’s most significant challenge came just over a year after he took up the premiership amid anger in Holyrood. In April 2024, the first minister announced the termination of the power-sharing deal with the Scottish Green Party. The Greens had desired to vote on the agreement’s future. This vote is over outrage at the SNP’s scrapping of crucial climate goals. It also includes the response to the Cass report into gender services for under-18s in England and Wales. Hours after some news that he would leave Hollywood, Humza Yousaf’s Resignation was declared. Humza said he had misjudged the feelings of the Green Party when he cut relations with them. One of the reasons for Humza Yousaf’s resignation could be his different idea about Palestine. Humza Yousaf previously wrote to Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, urging the United Kingdom to recognize the State of Palestine officially. His goal was to break the political deadlock that has condemned Israelis and Palestinians to ongoing cycles of violence. The letter was sent before a discussion in the Scottish Parliament on the condition of the Middle East on 21 November. Yousaf also sent the letter to the Leader of the Opposition in the U.K. Parliament, Sir Keir Starmer. He opened the debate on a government motion calling for the release of hostages and urging all regional actors to agree to an immediate ceasefire. In the letter, Yousaf expressed his views on the Gaza crisis and suggested that the U.K. recognize the State of Palestine within the 1967 borders, similar to the 130 members of the United Nations, including nine E.U. members, and as the new Spanish Government has promised. Yousaf criticising Westminster In broadcast interviews, the former Leader of Scotland’s devolved administration expressed sorrow about Gaza. Yousaf said to ITV News when questioned if he believes the U.K. government is respecting Palestinian lives the same way it values those of Israelis. He added, “That is the exact point, that the life of a Palestinian is equal to the life of an Israeli”. Yousaf also informed earlier that his mother-in-law and father-in-law were in Gaza. He stated that there is a lack of political consideration for the poor people of Gaza. It feels like ‘Palestinian blood is very cheap’, he said. What was the record of SNP in elections? When Labour collapsed from 41 seats to just one in 2015, it wasn’t easy to see any road to recovery. During the Independence Referendum, the SNP went from six M.P.s to 56. In 2017, Labour won six additional seats, representing 27.1% of the vote – a 2.8% increase from the previous election. However, the Conservatives performed best, almost doubling their vote share in gaining 12 seats. The SNP lost 21 seats as their vote share declined by 13.1%. The Conservatives and the SNP shaped the constitutional debate, with the former becoming the main opposition to SNP and independence. In 2019, the SNP solidified its lead, winning 45% of the vote, gaining 14 seats while losing one. Despite experiencing a mere 3.5% decrease in their vote share, the Conservatives ceded seven seats to the SNP. Labour’s advancement in 2017 was nullified, with the party witnessing an 8.4% drop in vote share and losing six seats to the SNP. Consistent with 2015, Edinburgh South remained the sole Labour seat that the SNP could not capture. SNP’s outlook post-Humza Yousaf’s resignation Scotland’s first minister, John Swinney, has admitted that the upcoming general election will be challenging. The SNP experienced a “tough time” after Humza Yousaf’s Resignation. However, members are “united” and “focused on winning.” Heading into this election, however, Labour led the SNP by 4 points. This is the first time Labour has led the SNP since the party was nearly wiped out in 2015. Labour looks set to regain a significant foothold in Scotland, particularly in its former heartlands in the central belt. One in three Scots (33%) currently intend to vote for Labour at the forthcoming general election, followed by the SNP (31%). The SNP have lost a fifth (20%) of their 2019 voters to Labour, but they hold on to 66% of those who previously backed them.